During Pregnancy – Support, support, support, it’s that easy. Help your partner eat well, exercise, rest and stress as little as possible. They are creating life within their womb. Love, support and understanding will go a long way for the both of them.

During Pregnancy – Support, support, support, it’s that easy. Help your partner eat well, exercise, rest and stress as little as possible. Try to become more in tune with her, like smells/ foods that affect her. Go with her to the baby appointments. Communicate. Talking about things ahead of time, when possible, will help remove strong feelings of certain situations or disagreements, and can help her feel you are invested and committed. 

During Birth – Be there when she needs you; give space when she needs that too. Talk about your birth plan and how much you would like to be involved and how much she wants you to be involved. There are many important things you can do from holding her body in certain birthing positions, helping her to breathe through contractions, encouraging her, distracting her from the pain, being there for moral support or just giving her space. You can interact with the birthing process as well by touching your baby’s head as it crowns, cutting the umbilical cord and even catching the baby. Holding your newborn child skin-to-skin while the birth attendant tends to any tearing is a great opportunity for your first bonding moment.

During Postpartum – After birth, your partner will be healing from either a natural birth or cesarean and may need help getting around for a few days or even weeks. Preparing food and doing household chores may help immensely as well as minding older siblings. Premade frozen homemade meals that just need heating up and meal trains can help at this time. Your partner may also be experiencing hormonal changes, so being there emotionally for her is huge too. A calm, steady and loving presence can be key through the many changes and ups and downs. Aunty Tina would always remind fathers that they may be surprised by their own emotions so don’t forget to take time to nurture yourself as well. You cannot give from an empty vessel.

During the Witching Hour – Between 3 -12 weeks there may be a certain time of day, normally around dusk that your baby may fuss and cry more than normal. This is also the time of day that a new mother may be at her most tired after sleepless nights and long days. This is a great opportunity for you to swaddle baby up and carry her/him in your arms or in a baby carrier and walk. The closeness of your body to your baby is soothing, as is the constant movement. The garden is also often a cool and quiet place at this time of day away from stimulus. You can even softly talk or sing to your baby lovingly, taking this time as a great opportunity for you two to bond. 

Soothing your Newborn – Skin-to-skin works wonders for both you and your baby. They can feel your heart beat, a familiarity from their mother’s womb, and can feel the warmth and smell of your skin. You can also soothe a crying newborn by placing your clean, trimmed little finger inside their mouth. Make sure you are touching the roof of the mouth, so they can latch on and suck. You will feel the baby suckling straight away and hopefully it will help them settle down. 

During Birth – Be there when she needs you, give space when she needs that too. Talk about your birth plan and how much you would like to be involved and how much she wants you involved. There are many important things you can do from holding her body in certain birthing positions, helping her to breathe through contractions, encouraging her, distracting her from the pain, just being there for moral support or just giving her space. You can interact with the birthing process as well by touching your baby’s head as it crowns, cutting the umbilical cord and even catching the baby. Holding your newly born child while the birth attendant tends to any tearing. 

During Postpartum – After birth, your partner will be healing from either a natural birth or cesarean and may need help getting around for a few days or even weeks. If you are able to take on the caretaker role this will help mother and baby so she can focus on healing and your newborn. Preparing food and doing household chores may help immensely as well as minding older siblings. Premade frozen home-made meals that just need heating up and meal trains can help at this time. Your partner may also be experiencing imbalanced emotions related to her hormones, so being there emotionally for her is huge too. Aunty Tina would always remind fathers that they may be surprised by their own emotions so don’t forget to take time to nurture yourself as well. You cannot give from an empty vessel.

During the Witching Hour – Between 3 -12 weeks there may be a certain time of day, normally around dusk that your baby may fuss and cry more than normal. This is also the time of day that a new mother may be at her most tired after sleepless nights and long days. This is a great opportunity for you to swaddle baby up and carry her/him in your arms or in a baby carrier and walk. The closeness of your body to your baby’s is soothing, as is the constant movement. The garden is often a cool and quiet place at this time of day and away from stimulus. You can even softly talk or sing to your baby lovingly and is a great way for you two to bond. 

Soothing your Newborn – Skin to skin works wonders for both you and your baby. They can feel your heart beat, a familiarity from their mother’s womb, and can feel the warmth and smell of your skin. You can also soothe a crying newborn by placing your clean, trimmed little finger inside their mouth. Make sure you are touching the roof of the mouth, so they can latch on and suck. You will feel the baby suckling straight away as they settle down. 

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